Spiny burrgrass - longispinus (Cenchrus longispinus)

Also known as: gentle Annie, innocent weed

Spiny burrgrass - longispinus is an annual grass, similar in appearance to spiny burrgrass C. spinifex).

Profile

How does this weed affect you?

Spiny burrgrass is a weed because of its sharp and clingy burr, ability to spread rapidly and tendency to develop into dense infestations in favourable conditions. It is also difficult and expensive to manage, especially in marginal rainfall areas.

Mature burrs cause a range of problems such as:

  • injury to stock causing swellings and ulcers in the mouth
  • injury to people and dogs
  • clinging to wool and penetrating the skin of stock, reducing the value of both
  • shearing difficulties, which often attracts penalty rates as working with contaminated wool requires leather gloves and/or aprons.
  • inconvenience and discomfort to workers in irrigated crops such as vegetables, vines and citrus, and
  • contamination of dried fruit and hay.

Where is it found?

Spiny burrgrass - longispinus is less widespread that spiny burrgrass (C. spinifex). It occurs on the slopes and plains of NSW. 

How does it spread?

he major spread of this weed is by seed. The seed is well equipped for spread because of the barbed spines on the burr, which detach easily from the mature plant.

What does it look like?

Spiny burrgrass - longispinus is an erect or spreading grass to 60 cm high. It is similar in general appearance to spiny burrgass (C. spinifex) but differs in having longer spikelet or sburr heads (5.8 - 7.6 mm long), those of spiny burrgrass being 3.4 - 5.8 cm long. The spines are generally longer compared to spiny burrgrass. The burrs are often tinged purple and those of spiny burrgrass are rarely tinted. 

back to top

Control

Herbicide options

WARNING - ALWAYS READ THE LABEL
Users of agricultural or veterinary chemical products must always read the label and any permit, before using the product, and strictly comply with the directions on the label and the conditions of any permit. Users are not absolved from compliance with the directions on the label or the conditions of the permit by reason of any statement made or not made in this information. To view permits or product labels go to the Australian Pesticides and Veterinary Medicines Authority website www.apvma.gov.au

See Using herbicides for more information.


Glyphosate 360 g/L (Roundup®)
Rate: 500–700 mL in 100 L of water
Comments: High volume spot spray. Apply to actively growing plants before seeding. Glyphosate is non-selective. Apply in non-crop areas and roadsides.
Withholding period: Nil.
Herbicide group: M, Inhibitors of EPSP synthase
Resistance risk: Moderate


Glyphosate 360 g/L (Roundup®)
Rate: 2.0–3.0 L/ha
Comments: Boom spray. Apply to actively growing plants before seeding. Glyphosate is non-selective. Apply in non-crop areas and roadsides.
Withholding period: Nil.
Herbicide group: M, Inhibitors of EPSP synthase
Resistance risk: Moderate


MSMA 720 g/L (Armada 720 SL)
Rate: 1.0 L in 100 L of water
Comments: Spot spray application. Do not cut or graze effected area for 5 weeks.
Withholding period: 5 weeks.
Herbicide group: Z, Herbicides with unknown and probably diverse sites of action
Resistance risk: Moderate


back to top

Biosecurity duty

The content provided here is for information purposes only and is taken from the Biosecurity Act 2015 and its subordinate legislation, and the Regional Strategic Weed Management Plans (published by each Local Land Services region in NSW). It describes the state and regional priorities for weeds in New South Wales, Australia.

Area Duty
All of NSW General Biosecurity Duty
All plants are regulated with a general biosecurity duty to prevent, eliminate or minimise any biosecurity risk they may pose. Any person who deals with any plant, who knows (or ought to know) of any biosecurity risk, has a duty to ensure the risk is prevented, eliminated or minimised, so far as is reasonably practicable.
Central Tablelands
Exclusion zone: whole region except the core infestation area of Mid-Western Regional Council, Bathurst Council, Cabonne Council and Cowra Council areas
Regional Recommended Measure*
Whole region: The plant should not be bought, sold, grown, carried or released into the environment. Exclusion zone: The plant should be eradicated from the land and the land kept free of the plant. Land managers should mitigate the risk of the plant being introduced to their land. Core infestation area: Land managers should mitigate spread from their land.
Central West Regional Recommended Measure*
Land managers should mitigate the risk of new weeds being introduced to their land. Land managers should mitigate spread from their land. The plant should not be bought, sold, grown, carried or released into the environment.
Western Regional Recommended Measure*
Land managers should mitigate spread from their land. Plant should not be bought, sold, grown, carried or released into the environment.
*To see the Regional Strategic Weeds Management Plans containing demonstrated outcomes that fulfill the general biosecurity duty for this weed click here

back to top


Reviewed 2017