St. Barnaby's thistle (Centaurea solstitialis)

Profile

Impact

It will outcompete crops and pastures and dense patches can restrict stock movement.

Distribution

It is well established through many parts of NSW. 

Description

St Barnaby’s thistle is an annual or short-lived plant, to 75 cm high. Flower heads are bright yellow surrounded by rows of yellow spines. 

References

Parsons W.T. and Cuthbertson E.G. (1992) Noxious weeds of Australia. (Inkata Press, Melbourne).

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Control

Herbicide options

WARNING - ALWAYS READ THE LABEL
Users of agricultural or veterinary chemical products must always read the label and any permit, before using the product, and strictly comply with the directions on the label and the conditions of any permit. Users are not absolved from compliance with the directions on the label or the conditions of the permit by reason of any statement made or not made in this information. To view permits or product labels go to the Australian Pesticides and Veterinary Medicines Authority website www.apvma.gov.au

See Using herbicides for more information.


2,4-D LV ester 680g/L (Estercide® Xtra)
Rate: 1.15 - 1.7 L per Hectare
Comments: Boom spray application
Withholding period: 7 days
Herbicide group: I, Disruptors of plant cell growth (synthetic auxins)
Resistance risk: Moderate


Fluroxypyr 140 g/L + Aminopyralid 10 g/L (Hot Shot™ )
Rate: 500 ml in 100 L of water
Comments: Hand gun application
Withholding period: 7 days. See label for export restrictions.
Herbicide group: I, Disruptors of plant cell growth (synthetic auxins)
Resistance risk: Moderate


Glufosinate-ammonium 200 g/L (Basta® )
Rate: 1.5–5.0 L/ha
Comments: Boom spray. Actively growing rosettes.
Withholding period: 8 weeks.
Herbicide group: N, Inhibitors of glutamine synthetase
Resistance risk: Moderate


Glufosinate-ammonium 200 g/L (Basta® )
Rate: 500 ml in 100 L of water
Comments: Hand gun application
Withholding period: 8 weeks.
Herbicide group: N, Inhibitors of glutamine synthetase
Resistance risk: Moderate


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Biosecurity duty

The content provided here is for information purposes only and is taken from the Biosecurity Act 2015 and its subordinate legislation, and the Regional Strategic Weed Management Plans (published by each Local Land Services region in NSW). It describes the state and regional priorities for weeds in New South Wales, Australia.

Area Duty
All of NSW General Biosecurity Duty
All plants are regulated with a general biosecurity duty to prevent, eliminate or minimise any biosecurity risk they may pose. Any person who deals with any plant, who knows (or ought to know) of any biosecurity risk, has a duty to ensure the risk is prevented, eliminated or minimised, so far as is reasonably practicable.

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Reviewed 2014