Water soldier (Stratiotes aloides)

WEED ALERT: STATE PROHIBITED WEED
If you see this plant contact your council weeds officer, the NSW Invasive Plants & Animals Enquiry Line 1800 680 244 or email weeds@dpi.nsw.gov.au

Profile

Impact

Water soldier is an emergent aquatic plant that has the potential to become a serious weed of freshwater lakes, ponds and dams in Australia. It is a plant with vigorous growth that forms dense stands in suitable conditions. These dense stands can exclude native wetland plants and destroy aquatic habitats.

Water soldier leaves resemble aloe plants, and as such it is also called water aloe.

Water soldier has an unusual growth habit. It is a submerged plant except in summer when it rises to the water surface to flower. The new leaves that grow in spring contain air pockets allowing the plant to float. As the older leaves die back in autumn they become waterlogged which causes the plant to sink again.

Water soldier can remain submerged all year round and can grow in depths of up to 5 m.

Description

Water soldier is an emergent aquatic plant that has the potential to become a serious weed of freshwater lakes, ponds and dams in Australia. It is a plant with vigorous growth that forms dense stands in suitable conditions. These dense stands can exclude native wetland plants and destroy aquatic habitats.

Water soldier leaves resemble aloe plants, and as such it is also called water aloe.

Water soldier has an unusual growth habit. It is a submerged plant except in summer when it rises to the water surface to flower. The new leaves that grow in spring contain air pockets allowing the plant to float. As the older leaves die back in autumn they become waterlogged which causes the plant to sink again.

Water soldier can remain submerged all year round and can grow in depths of up to 5 m.

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Control

Herbicide options

Contact your local council weeds officer for control advice for Water soldier (Stratiotes aloides).

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Legal requirements

The content provided here is for information purposes only and is taken from the Noxious Weeds (Weed Control) Order 2014 published in the NSW Government Gazette, detailing weeds declared noxious in New South Wales, Australia, under the Noxious Weeds Act 1993. The Order lists the weed names, the control class and the control requirements for each species declared in a Local Control Authority area.

Area Class Legal requirements
All of NSW 1 State Prohibited Weed
The plant must be eradicated from the land and that land must be kept free of the plant

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Reviewed 2014