Bamboo (Bambusa species)

Also known as: clumping bamboo

Bamboo is a clumping plant with hollow greenish-yellow canes. Dense stands grow to exclude other vegetation.

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How does this weed affect you?

Bamboo is a member of the grass family. Although not as invasive as running bamboo (Phyllostachys species), clumping types of bamboo (Bambusa species) have proven to be problematic in parts of Australia where dense, clumping stands of bamboo exclude other vegetation. There are over 100 species of Bambusa, with three native to northern Australia. 

How does it spread?

Bamboo rarely produces seed. It spreads as a dense clump, by producing shoots from the ends of its rhizomes (underground stems) close to the orginal clump. Dumping of garden rubbish containing rhizome fragments results in spread from gardens into bushland and other areas.  

What does it look like?

Bamboo is a woody, clumping plant. The various species of bamboo can occur as shrubs through to trees. The stems of bamboo are circular in cross-section, and hollow. Leaves have parallel veins. Bamboo can be distinguished from rhizomatous or running bamboo (Phyllostachys spp.) whose stems are flattened and grooved in cross section. 

References

Auld, B. and Medd, R. (1987), Weeds: An illustrated botanical guide to the weeds of Australia, Department of Agriculture New South Wales, Melbourne.

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Control

Herbicide options

WARNING - ALWAYS READ THE LABEL
Users of agricultural or veterinary chemical products must always read the label and any permit, before using the product, and strictly comply with the directions on the label and the conditions of any permit. Users are not absolved from compliance with the directions on the label or the conditions of the permit by reason of any statement made or not made in this information. To view permits or product labels go to the Australian Pesticides and Veterinary Medicines Authority website www.apvma.gov.au

See Using herbicides for more information.


PERMIT 9907 Expires 31/03/2020
Glyphosate 360 g/L (Roundup®)
Rate: 1 part glyphosate to 50 parts water
Comments: Spot spray. Spray regrowth up to 0.5 m only.
Withholding period: Nil.
Herbicide group: M, Inhibitors of EPSP synthase
Resistance risk: Moderate


PERMIT 9907 Expires 31/03/2020
Glyphosate 360 g/L (Roundup®)
Rate: 1 part glyphosate to 1.5 parts water
Comments: Cut stump. Retreatment necessary.
Withholding period: Nil.
Herbicide group: M, Inhibitors of EPSP synthase
Resistance risk: Moderate


PERMIT 14302 Expires 30/09/2018
Flupropanate 745 g/L (Tussock®)
Rate: 1 L in 100 L of water
Comments: Hand gun application
Withholding period: Don't graze cows or goats that are being milked on treated areas. Blanket sprayed pastures - grazing or cutting for stock feed - 120 days. Spot sprayed areas - grazing or cutting for stock feed - 14 days. Don't graze stock on treated areas for 14 days prior to slaughter.
Herbicide group: J, Inhibitors of fat synthesis (Not ACCase inhibitors)
Resistance risk: Moderate


Glyphosate 360 g/L (Roundup®)
Rate: 10 mL per 1 L of water.
Comments: Foliar application between 1 and 2 m tall.
Withholding period: Nil.
Herbicide group: M, Inhibitors of EPSP synthase
Resistance risk: Moderate


Glyphosate 360 g/L (Roundup®)
Rate: 1 part glyphosate to 6 parts water
Comments: Cut stump method. Cut stems to 20 cm. Pour mixture down stem or wet cut.
Withholding period: Nil.
Herbicide group: M, Inhibitors of EPSP synthase
Resistance risk: Moderate


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Biosecurity duty

The content provided here is for information purposes only and is taken from the Biosecurity Act 2015 and its subordinate legislation, and the Regional Strategic Weed Management Plans (published by each Local Land Services region in NSW). It describes the state and regional priorities for weeds in New South Wales, Australia.

Area Duty
All of NSW General Biosecurity Duty
All plants are regulated with a general biosecurity duty to prevent, eliminate or minimise any biosecurity risk they may pose. Any person who deals with any plant, who knows (or ought to know) of any biosecurity risk, has a duty to ensure the risk is prevented, eliminated or minimised, so far as is reasonably practicable.

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Reviewed 2014