Common thornapple (Datura stramonium)

Profile

Impact

Thornapple will invade waste ground, disturbed agriculutral land, creek banks and semi-arid pasture.

Toxicity

Thornapple is highly toxic to humans, capable of causing serious illness or death. All parts of the plant, particularly the flowers, seeds and nectar are poisonous, causing thirst, increased temperatures, rapid pulse, incoherence and convulsions. 

The entire plant is also poisonous to livestock and pets. 

What to do if poisoning occurs:

  • If the patient is unconscious, unresponsive or having difficulty breathing dial 000 or get to the emergency section of a hospital immediately.
  • If the patient is conscious and responsive call the Poisons Information Centre on 13 11 26 or your doctor.
  • If going to a hospital take a piece of the plant for identification.

Description

Common thornapple is a short-lives plant that grows in disturbed sites. Flowers are white-lilac 6-8 cm long. Seed capsules are large and oval shaped with numerous spines varying in lengths. 

The entire plant is poisonous to humans, pets and livestock.

References

Richardson F.J.,Richardson R.G. and Shepherd R.C.H (2006).Weeds of the south-east an identification guide for Australia. (R.G. and F.J. Richardson, Melbourne).

back to top

Control

Herbicide options

Contact your local council weeds officer for control advice for Common thornapple (Datura stramonium).

back to top

Legal requirements

The content provided here is for information purposes only and is taken from the Noxious Weeds (Weed Control) Order 2014 published in the NSW Government Gazette, detailing weeds declared noxious in New South Wales, Australia, under the Noxious Weeds Act 1993. The Order lists the weed names, the control class and the control requirements for each species declared in a Local Control Authority area.

Area Class Legal requirements
Lord Howe Island 3 Regionally Controlled Weed
The plant must be fully and continuously suppressed and destroyed and the plant must not be sold, propagated or knowingly distributed

back to top


For technical advice and assistance with identification please contact your local council weeds officer.
For further information call the NSW Invasive Plants and Animals Enquiry Line on 1800 680 244 or send an email to weeds@dpi.nsw.gov.au

Reviewed 2014