Common thornapple (Datura stramonium)

Profile

Impact

Thornapple will invade waste ground, disturbed agriculutral land, creek banks and semi-arid pasture.

Toxicity

Thornapple is highly toxic to humans, capable of causing serious illness or death. All parts of the plant, particularly the flowers, seeds and nectar are poisonous, causing thirst, increased temperatures, rapid pulse, incoherence and convulsions. 

The entire plant is also poisonous to livestock and pets. 

What to do if poisoning occurs:

  • If the patient is unconscious, unresponsive or having difficulty breathing dial 000 or get to the emergency section of a hospital immediately.
  • If the patient is conscious and responsive call the Poisons Information Centre on 13 11 26 or your doctor.
  • If going to a hospital take a piece of the plant for identification.

Description

Common thornapple is a short-lives plant that grows in disturbed sites. Flowers are white-lilac 6-8 cm long. Seed capsules are large and oval shaped with numerous spines varying in lengths. 

The entire plant is poisonous to humans, pets and livestock.

References

Richardson F.J.,Richardson R.G. and Shepherd R.C.H (2006).Weeds of the south-east an identification guide for Australia. (R.G. and F.J. Richardson, Melbourne).

back to top

Control

Herbicide options

Contact your local council weeds officer for control advice for Common thornapple (Datura stramonium).

back to top

Biosecurity duty

The content provided here is for information purposes only and is taken from the Biosecurity Act 2015 and its subordinate legislation, and the Regional Strategic Weed Management Plans (published by each Local Land Services region in NSW). It describes the state and regional priorities for weeds in New South Wales, Australia.

Area Duty
All of NSW General Biosecurity Duty
All plants are regulated with a general biosecurity duty to prevent, eliminate or minimise any biosecurity risk they may pose. Any person who deals with any plant, who knows (or ought to know) of any biosecurity risk, has a duty to ensure the risk is prevented, eliminated or minimised, so far as is reasonably practicable.

back to top


Reviewed 2014