Trad (Tradescantia fluminensis)

Also known as: Wandering Jew

Trad is a trailing succulent garden escape. It out-competes native vegetation and smothers the ground.

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How does this weed affect you?

Trad forms dense mats that smother and outcompete other plants. In forests it can prevent native plants from growing. It causes skin irritation to some people and dogs.

What does it look like?

Trad is a succulant perennial ground cover.  It has green stems that are wider at the nodes. The leaves are shiny, dark green up to 5.5 cm long with viens running lengthwise. The leaves are slightly heartshaped at the base and have sheath where they clasp the stem. The flowers are mostly present from spring to summer. Flowers have 3 white petals up to 1 cm long. 

Where is it found?

Trad has been found growing along the coast from the North Coast to Greater Sydney region.  It also grows in the Northern Tablelands.

What type of environment does it grow in?

Trad is more common in areas with high rainfall. It preferes moist, shady sites and is sensitve to frosts. It grows in woodlands, forests, along waterways and is also a weed in gardens. 

More information

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Control

By hand

Very small infestations can be pulled out by hand but every single stem node must be removed. Larger infestations can be raked first and then followed up by hand weeding. Plants can be composted under black plastic in full sun. Contact your local council for advice on how to dispose of this weed. 

Chemical control

Spraying is best for dense infestations which are not close to desirable species. Thoroughly cover all parts of the plant with herbicide.

Weed wipers can be used for Trad growing amongst native plants to avoid off target damage from spray drift.

Repeat applications are often needed. 

Herbicide options

WARNING - ALWAYS READ THE LABEL
Users of agricultural or veterinary chemical products must always read the label and any permit, before using the product, and strictly comply with the directions on the label and the conditions of any permit. Users are not absolved from compliance with the directions on the label or the conditions of the permit by reason of any statement made or not made in this information. To view permits or product labels go to the Australian Pesticides and Veterinary Medicines Authority website www.apvma.gov.au

See Using herbicides for more information.


PERMIT 9907 Expires 31/03/2025
Glyphosate 360 g/L (Various products)
Rate: 200 mL per 10 L of water
Comments: Treat in winter or early spring. For best results, add a surfactant. Apply two sprays, 6–8 weeks apart. Repeat treatments are essential.
Withholding period: Nil.
Herbicide group: M, Inhibitors of EPSP synthase
Resistance risk: Moderate


Fluroxypyr 200 g/L (Comet® 200 herbicide)
Rate: 1.5 L in 100 L of water
Comments: Foliar application. Re-treatment necessary. Young plants up to and including flowering.
Withholding period: Do not graze failed crops and treated pastures or cut for stock feed for 7 days after application. See label for further information.
Herbicide group: I, Disruptors of plant cell growth (synthetic auxins)
Resistance risk: Moderate


Fluroxypyr 333 g/L (Starane™ Advanced)
Rate: 900 mL in 100 L of water
Comments: Foliar application. Re-treatment necessary. Young plants up to and including flowering.
Withholding period: Do not graze failed crops and treated pastures or cut for stock food for 7 days after application. See label for more information.
Herbicide group: I, Disruptors of plant cell growth (synthetic auxins)
Resistance risk: Moderate


Picloram 44.7 g/L + Aminopyralid 4.47 g/L (Vigilant II ®)
Rate: Undiluted (16 g /m2))
Comments: Use a long-handled paint roller or similar making sure the foliage has been completely flattened during application.
Withholding period: Nil.
Herbicide group: I, Disruptors of plant cell growth (synthetic auxins)
Resistance risk: Moderate


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Biosecurity duty

The content provided here is for information purposes only and is taken from the Biosecurity Act 2015 and its subordinate legislation, and the Regional Strategic Weed Management Plans (published by each Local Land Services region in NSW). It describes the state and regional priorities for weeds in New South Wales, Australia.

Area Duty
All of NSW General Biosecurity Duty
All plants are regulated with a general biosecurity duty to prevent, eliminate or minimise any biosecurity risk they may pose. Any person who deals with any plant, who knows (or ought to know) of any biosecurity risk, has a duty to ensure the risk is prevented, eliminated or minimised, so far as is reasonably practicable.

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For technical advice and assistance with identification please contact your local council weeds officer.
For further information call the NSW DPI Biosecurity Helpline on 1800 680 244 or send an email to weeds@dpi.nsw.gov.au

Reviewed 2014